Thursday, August 29, 2013

Monday, August 26, 2013

There's no crying in news; or, why rookies need to grow a backbone and become a Vulcan

(In this scene the News Director has just chastised his rookie reporter for nothing in particular since he loves keeping the upper hand. As expected, the tears begin to flow, pleasing the ND to no end.)

ND: Are you... crying?"
Reporter: (Trying in vain to hold back tears) No. No.
ND: Are those.... tears?
Reporter: No.
ND: There's no crying in news! Did Walter Cronkite cry? No! Did Edward R. Murrow cry? Nooooo! Because there's no crying in news!

Unfortunately, these days there seems to be a lot of crying in news. This year I've had more phone calls from reporters in tears than ever before. For whatever reason, managers seem to take perverse pleasure in ripping their new employees, when they should be doing just the opposite. While a News Director doesn't need to treat rookies like the bubblewrapped kids we often see in this country, he doesn't need to make the new kid walk on eggshells.

Let's face it, some NDs really get off on the power trip, and that's why many of them are stuck in small markets or working for lousy companies. But we've covered that ground before.

So it's time to channel your inner Vulcan. You must become Mister Spock, and check your emotions at the door.

You must grow a backbone. I'm not telling you to be insubordinate, but until you show managers that they can't get under your skin, they'll keep hammering you. You must keep in mind that it is simply management manipulation to make you feel less confident about your abilities, and therefore, less confident when it comes to job hunting.

But this isn't about them, it's about you.

Learn to sort constructive criticism from the comments that are simply mean spirited. Always consider the source of the comment. Just because someone carries a title of ND or Executive Producer doesn't make that person an authority on anything. There are hordes of crash test dummies working in positions of power.

Grow the backbone. Be the Vulcan and don't show your emotions. Raise your shields. As soon as you brush off nasty comments, they'll stop. The best defense is to be cheerful right after you've gotten hammered. Go back to the newsroom, tell a joke, laugh. Let them know they're not pushing your buttons.

Live long and prosper.